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Back Brushing While Spraying For A Quality Job

Back Brushing While Spraying For A Quality Job
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Everyone understands that using an airless paint sprayer could reduce hours of work when painting a house or project

. Putting paint on by hand with the traditional brush and roller is time consuming and seems during this point in time to be... well, somewhat out-dated. Considering the advent of paint sprayers that might shoot a gallon per minute it just does not make sense to try and do it by hand when you could spray it out with one tenth of the time, or does it? Actually, in lots of cases, especially when the area to be painted is coarse or extremely textured, using an airless (or any kind of sprayer ) will wind up giving you a much poorer quality job than if it were paint brush or roller applied.

The explanation for this is because paint that's been spray applied tends to dry to the surface only, which can be perfectly acceptable when spraying a really smooth or slick surface. But when the substrate you plan to paint is textured or really rough, you need the added benefit of an actual person pushing that paint onto the surface. A high quality finish is usually defined by a paint job that is solid, almost like it was wrapped in cellophane... brushing the paint can often do this when spraying will not.

The solution to this problem is to simply use both with a method long employed by top notch painters known as "back brushing". Back brushing is a superb technique when your job is rough or porous and you have countless square feet to complete by using your spray rig to put the paint on the wall and than working it in and smoothing it out using a paint paintbrush. This provides you a chance to avoid wasting time by spraying out a small area without having to repeatedly dip your paintbrush, and still push it into the textured substrate by rapidly brushing it out. If you are set up correctly for this and you recognize the concept it provides you with the benefits from each tool without losing quality.

I like this method as it works very well and lets you move across wider areas rapidly while still providing a hand applied finish. Not only does back brushing help fill in cracks and small crevices, but it also puts the paint on a good deal thicker than just sprayed. Since dry film thickness is vital to protection and warranties from paint manufacturers... this can be an extra benefit. In fact, We have always found that paintbrush application would usually use around twenty% more paint than if spray applied. This is due to the additional millage going onto your wall when applied by paintbrush. This additional thickness and improved penetration of the rough substrate will add years to your paint job as compared to being spray only.
Back Brushing While Spraying For A Quality Job
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Reputable and knowledgeable painters will know to apply this method when the surface needs it. Often times a low bidder may want to spray only, whereas the other contractor might be aiming to backbrush, which can obviously, add towards the cost of paint and labor. I should also point out that generally, back brushing will generally use about twenty% additional paint than when simply sprayed. This further illustrates that more paint is being put on the surface if it's hand applied or backbrushed as compared to spray only. I hope you found this useful and I encourage you to implement back brushing the next time you are painting a large exterior that's coarse or textured.

by: larg64dwas


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Back Brushing While Spraying For A Quality Job Ashburn